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Tabbard Tunic Top

This is a simple sleeveless dress with bust darts to add a bit of shape. It looks rather like those old pinafores people used to wear hence the name.

It is easy to wear – either as a comfortable tunic when worn over a tee shirt and leggings or a cool dress for those hotter days. This Summer I hardly need say I have been wearing it as a tunic, over leggings, with a cardigan!

I would be very pleased with it if it wasn’t for the fabric…..

Fabric & Purchase Details

I bought this material locally from the Button Box in Huddersfield Market.  . It is 100% cotton.

I prefer to use natural fibres because on consideration they are the greenest, biodegradable option and, even better, they don’t shed plastic microfibres when washed.

Just in case you need it, here is a quick  intro to synthetic, regenerated, combination and natural fibres here. And more reasons why I prefer natural fabrics over the others can be found here.

Notes On This Cotton – Craft Fabric

kate

It is a silky fabric that creases easily. I mean really easily. I wear it for seconds and it looks like crumpled paper. I am not sure it is a dress making fabric. It was sold in small bales folded on a cardboard board. In a section of the shop called craft fabrics. I think they are mainly used for patchwork and quilting. Is this cotton somehow different?  Rose & Hubble fabrics are sold the same way and the stuff I used for my loon pants worked out fie.  I thought with washing it would soften it as has happened with my loon pants. These are made out of Rose & Hubble cotton. They are now so soft I don’t need to iron them. Actually I never ironed them and while they looked rumpled I could get away with it. Not a chance of that with this top! Still as stiff as a board, needs ironing before I can wear it. Even with my low sartorial standard I feel I have to do at least that. Once on, it creases immediately.

As time has passed it’s tendency to crease has annoyed me more and more. As has the constant ironing.

Pattern New Look 6558

Fixtures & Fittings Cotton bias binding round the neck and arms sold by the meter at the shop.

Made with…

It was cut out with all metal scissors from the C. Booths Hardware Shop in Huddersfield, sewn together using organic cotton on a wooden reel and made using plastic free sewing supplies  (you can find them here).

Sustainable Rating

Natural fibres
Fabric was bought plastic free – no packaging
Supporting a local fabric shop
Homemade by me
Made with plastic free sewing supplies (you can find them here)

Weighs In At

149 grams Why the weighing? Well this item of clothing is counted as part of my fair share fabrics project. This is a self imposed rationing system. I use no more than my global share of fibres and they have to be sustainably sourced. Whats a global share? Share out all the fibres made by all the people on the planet and it works out, (very roughly), 11.74 kg per person of which 3.8 kg is natural fibres. As I don’t like synthetics I try to stick to 3.8 kg of natural fibres. Here are the figures in full.

More

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The Fulsome Foolish Skirt

We were planning to visit Seville for the Feria, the big flamenco party. To say it is dreey would be understating. I spent a lot of time wondering what I could possibly wear. The flamenco dresses I had seen looked very elaborate featuring different fabrics, trimmings and all manner frou-frouery. Needless to say I possessed nothing like that. Then, while meandering through the Indonesian markets, I came across some very lively sarongs. They were highly patterned strips of fabric featuring a bold use of color and frantic patterning. If, I thought, I was to make a skirt out of such sarongs, it would look extremely ornate. Not frilly but with a general air of exuberance that would make it suitable for a flamenco night out.

So I bought some. They were amazingly cheap but I was assured they were made from Indonesian cotton. They are not. They are synthetic fibres. I didn’t realize this till I got home, tried to iron them and they melted. I was annoyed. Not only did I have to spend hours scraping away at the iron but I don’t like wearing synthetic fabrics. I’m sure you know that synthetic fibres contribute to micro plastic pollution. When they are washed, they shed tiny, non-biodegradable, synthetic fibres into the drains. These are then washed out to sea where they are now polluting the oceans and being eaten by plankton.

Still I thought I could still make the skirt, wear it for the Feria, and never, ever wash it. After all how much demand would there be for such a lively skirt in my daily life? So I copied a pattern for a circular skirt from the internet, sewed it up and tried it on. It hung nicely but it was full…. very full. Draped over my Rubenesque curves it looked rather tent like – by which I mean a big top. It might have worked if I had made it from a different fabric. Something with less pattern and nicer colors. Lord knows what I was thinking but dominant tints were bottle green and aquamarine blue covered in hot pink and purple flowers. It looked funky in the market place as a sarong; it looked insane as a swirling skirt on a wide berthed middle aged woman. So much so I will not be featuring a photo of me modeling it.

So I now have a huge and very ugly skirt which I can never wash and never wear. But as I can’t bear waste so I am keeping it as a permanent pattern for future huge skirts I may wish to make. In fact I used it as the base for my Japanese Fish Wrap Skirt.

More

Weight 243g. This counts as part of my fair share fabrics project– a self imposed rationing system where I use no more than my global share of fibres and they have to be sustainably sourced. Whats a global share? 11.74 kg per person of which 3.8 kg is natural fibres. As I don’t like synthetics I try to stick to 3.8 kg of natural fibres.

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Fair Share Fabric Project

In 2015 I pledged to  use no more than my fair global share of fibres. I was trying to determine what is a reasonable amount of clothing. After all one mans over consumption is after all another’s nothing to wear.

How Much

However there can be little doubt that we in the UK are consuming fibres in a hugely unsustainable way.
Heres how many textile fibres are produced annually: Total fibres, both natural & synthetic, around 8.5 million tonnes Rough calculations suggest that the average amount of fibres per annum, per person in the world, works out at 11.74 kg.
We in the UK are using 55kg of fabric per person and 35kg of that is on clothes. We are obviously taking more than our share of fabrics produced.
If everyone on the planet was to have 35kg of clothes each year, production would have to triple.

Synthetic Versus Natural Fibres

One of the much touted benefits of plastic is that it reduces pressure on natural resources. Nowhere is this more true than in fabric and fibres.Producing natural fibres is certainly resource intensive. And synthetic fabrics have moved on since the early days of crimpolene and can now convincingly replace anything from wool to silk. They used to make the sheerest of stockings to the thickest and woolliest of fleece jackets. Dirty old fishing nets can be recycled into saucy bikinis.

And at a fraction of the price. So much so that synthetics now make up 60% of the market.

While using synthetic fibres means that less space is needed to grow cotton or flax, less pesticides are used and vegans can be pleased that less sheep need shearing and silk worms dont need to die for us.

But of course synthetics come with their own very real and severe environmental costs. Not least is that every time a synthetic fabric is washed it releases hundreds of tiny little plastic fibres these are washed out into the sea with grave consequences.

Some Will Have To Go Without?

If everyone on the planet was to have 35kg of clothes each year, production would have to triple.
This is unsustainable.
To replace all the synthetics with natural fibres would also have a huge environmental impact but synthetics need to be phased out.
So if we cannot produce more, we have to consume less. Or accept a huge global inequality where some have more clothes than they can possibly wear while others have a few rags.

Well not on my watch

Global Rationing
If we cannot produce more, we have to consume less. the purpose of this project is to see if I can live within my global share of natural fibres as produced at the current rate. And cut synthetics.

This is how the equation works for me:
We cannot exceed current levels of production:
We cannot expect others to want less than we have:
We cannot swamp the market with synthetics:
Therefore I have to live with my global share of natural fibres.

Global share 11.74 kg per person
of which 3.8 kg is natural fibres.
The rest is synthetics.
As I don’t like synthetics I try to stick to 3.8 kg of natural fibres.
Just so you know a kingsize double duvet cover from Ikea weighs in at 991 grams and a Marks & Spencer short-sleeved tee-shirt is 156 grams.

But can it be done? Cautious reply after 2 and a half years is yes it can.

You can read more on the subject and check my figures and sources here.

Whats Sustainable Clothing?
Plastic-free, fair-trade, ethically made and lots more.You can read my clothing manifesto here
You can read more on the subject and check

Second Hand Clothes
Can I buy second hand clothes to supplement my allowance? No. I can buy second-hand but it has to count as part of my allowance.

By Year Synopsis 

2017

The counting Has started….

2016

I used
3.835 natural fibres
318g synthetic fibres
Total 45g regenerated fibres
So I am over on natural fibres but way under on synthetics. Read more.
However in 2015  I bought 3.15 kg of natural fibre products and 3.2 kg of synthetic fibres. – so I had a 65g surplus of natural fibres to use up.

2015

I bought 3.15 kg of natural fibre products and 3.2 kg of synthetic fibres. See them here.

2014 & What I started with

Rationing might not seem so much of a burden if I already had a hundred outfits and enough sheets to stock a small hotel. I dont. You can see my original wardrobe here

Bought
knickers
2 pairs of trousers
1 nightie
1 Bra

Had

Tops, Cardigans & Jackets
4 no Long Sleeve Tops – cotton
1 grey – 2010
1 striped – 2009
1 blue – 2011
1 red – 2014 year
Ranging from 5 to 3 years old except the red which was bought last year.

6 no T Shirts & Vests – cotton (10)
1 grey – had for ever.
Marks & Sparks 2014 156g each – no hangers
1 black
1 navy
1 pale grey
1 vest – years plus
2 no Other (12)
wool tunic that I made from woolen fabric I have had for years. I have been wearing that for 18 months? Possibly longer.
Cotton shirt bought in India 2011

2 no Warmer wear & Coats (14)
1 synthetic jacket pre 2011
1 nylon raincoat pre 2011

4 no. Bottoms (18)
Shorts Summer 2014 Synthetic Fibres
Trackie bums cotton don’t know how old – over a year.
Thin long trews hot thin cotton bought Summer 2014
Thick long trews cold corduroy Autumn 2014 Marks & Spencers

1 no Skirts & Dresses (19)
Linen dress made for Observer Awards 2014

Underwear & Sleep
Knickers (20)
I have counted knickers as one because for some reason I feel shy about telling you how many pairs of pants I own!?
Philippino pirate pants
M&S sometime last year
France 2014 a pack of knickers
2 no Bras (21)
1 reasonable bought spring 2014 synthetic fibres
1 utterly awful that I only wear when the reasonable one is in the wash. At least 2 years old
4 no Socks (25)
2 thin pairs of socks – new before we left – gift.
2 thick pairs of sock – made by my mum.

5 no Sleep & Swim (32)

  • 1 nightgowns warm
  • 1 nightgown cool 2014 M&S
  • 1 Merino long johns 3 years at least
  • 2 bikinis years old– all synthetic
  • Towelling dressing gown
  • thin cotton dressing gown

7 no Outerwear Hats & Shawls (39)
1 wool hat 2013
1 straw hat 2014
1 wool scarf gift 2013
3 pairs of gloves
1 no shawl

2 no Work in progress (41)
Spotty dress work in progress bought from charity shop
Sleeveless long vest / sleeveless tunic most cotton bought in Malaysia 2011

4 no In storage (The cupboard we don’t talk about) (46)
Coats
1 smart – wool years old
1 very warm sheepskin second hand ages ago
2 waterproof  walking coat- synthetic years old
1 raincoat – synthetic cant even remember when

Other fabrics

back packers flannel

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Headscarf homemade

Made while backpacking!

I hate the sun on my head so I need to wear a covering of some sort. Hats are good because they have a brim but I have come to prefer huge head scarves when backpacking I realized this quite by accident.

We were invited into a yurt for some fermented camels milk by some friendly Khazaks who, as we were leaving, gave me a head scarf. I couldn’t say say no and was touched by their generosity but, and I know sound ungrateful, it was extremely ugly. At the time I couldn’t imagine ever wearing it so shoved it into the recesses of my pack.

Then I lost my hat. In a place where there were few hats to be had. And so I took to wearing the huge head scarf. And quickly learnt to appreciate the value of this multitasking product. It can be worn in a variety of ways from frumpy but super shady, useful when the sun is ferocious, to perky Rosie the Riveter style for sea bathing.

My default daily setting is an in-between babooksha style which protects head and neck. AND it can be used for all manner of other things such as

an extra towel for wet hair, – self explanatory
a bandanna style sunbathing top – tie tightly round the top of the bust. Sunbathing only. Don’t be too active!
a laundry bag. Put the laundry in the middled and knot the opposite corners to make a bundle

So hooray for scarves then! But not the Khazak scarf. I wanted a better scarf. And it had to meet the following criteria: It had to be bigger then your average, ten-a-ringitt, bikers bandanna because a) it had to be long enough to shade my neck and b) not make me look like mutton dressed as gang member.

It had to be made from natural fibres with no fringes. I find the fringes are always synthetic.

The fabric had to be thick enough to protect from the sun but not so thick it looked like a wimple.

And the design had to be acceptable. No youthful paisley or american flags, no middle aged flowers or indeterminate swirls. Finally it had to be cheap. I can tell you the above design brief seemingly rules out every ready-made scarf in SE Asia.

So I bought some fine cotton lawn in a Bangkok fabric market and made myself one. I used the ugly scarf as a pattern- 91cm square.

I cut it out with my straight metal nail scissors. Well cut and ripped. I sewed it using thread from the market – no idea wether it was natural or synthetic but it came unpackaged and on a cardboard tube. Needles I had with me – I find they come in very handy when backpacking. I turned over the edges, twice, then sewed it by hand.

Actually I have a confession. This is the second scarf I’ve sewed by hand. I made a rather stylish black and white number and lost it a day later! Another confession – that was the 2nd hat I’d lost. Careless!

All count as part of my Fair Share Fabric Project.

In 2015 I pledged to use no more than my fair global share of fibres and they have to be sustainably sourced. Whats a global share?11.74 kg per person of which 3.8 kg is natural fibres. You can see how I am doing here.

You can read more about plastic free  backpacking here

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A Totally Useless Coat?!

This has been a bad year for raincoats. My dear old coat that I had had for years, the faithful chum that had been up the hills, down to the shops, round Myanmar was looking… diseased. A white bloom had appeared on the collar and cuffs. I thought it was from my home made suntan lotion and it just needed a good wash. Big mistake. Turns out it wasn’t suntan lotion but the waterproof lining disintegrating. Washing only hastened that process and the coat, and everything else, came out of the washing machine covered in tiny white flecks of micro plastic.

We had only a few days before we left for China. I had to get a new lightweight waterproof coat quickly. I am way too tight to pay hiking shop prices so I went to TK Max. I ended up with a navy-blue, middle-aged anorak. It even had a belt! But it was cheap.

Amazingly it didn’t rain in Manchester before we left so I didn’t get chance to test it. That opportunity came in Xian, China where it didn’t stop raining. Turns out my new coat was bloody useless. So much so I cannot see what purpose it was actually meant to serve.

Now I want to make this quite clear from the beginning – I bought this coat from the outdoor wear section of TK Max. Yes it was massively reduced but at the time but I thought it was because of the particularly aggressive, ugly shade of navy colour and home counties, walking the golden labs style. I had my doubts about the silkiness of the fabric but modern shower proof fabrics are a huge step away so from those rustling plastic bags sold as cagoules back in the 70’s.

What persuaded me to buy was that it was so well made! There were all kinds ofoutdoorsy sort of features like a zip that opened from the top or the bottom, double fastenings with a flap to seal the pockets, a removable hood, overlapped seams and two layer of fabric on the shoulders for increased protection. Features that screamed “weather-based scenarios seriously catered for”.

And, and I cant say say this too often, it was in the outdoors section of the store. Surely I might be forgiven for thinking that this would be a reasonably weatherproof kind of coat. I was not expecting base camp performance but showerproof at least.

This coat did not offer the smallest degree of moisture based protection. Rather it sucked it up like a sponge. Thanks to the flaps and double front fastenings, the zip and pockets didn’t leak but everywhere else the water flooded through. Even the lightest of drizzle passed through in a moment. Which made it no good for the U.K. nor, (as it turns out), Xian. In 5 minutes I was soaked and freezing cold.

Which leads me to ask what purpose is this coat meant to serve? Is there some fashion I am unaware of? An indoors, outdoors kind look that I know nothing about? Are people sipping cocktails in Barbour look alike jackets that dissolve in the rain? Ravers off clubbing in Wellington boots made out of cardboard? But if that is the case then why was this jacket hanging up in, and I am going to say this again, in the frickin outdoor section!

Lucky we were near a Chinese supermarket that had an outdoor clothing section which sold jackets. Jackets you could actually wear out doors. Raincoats that repelled the rain. Fancy that!

So I bought one. Yes it is made from synthetic fibres but this is an example of plastic being the best material for the job. My new coat is light-weight, folds up small, dries out quickly and doesn’t get as mouldy or stinky. It is great for back packing. And it’s rain proof.

fabric rationing featured Both coats are counted as part of my Fair Share Fabric Project. In 2015 I pledged to  use no more than my fair global share of fibres and they have to be sustainably sourced. Whats a global share? 11.74 kg per person of which 3.8 kg is natural fibres.  You can see how I am doing here.

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Snood

How can you have so few clothes yet still have something you never wear?

Fearing the harsh Mongolian climate I made myself a snood/hat/scarf multi tasking sort of thing. It is knitted wool, stripy fabric backed with black knitted cotton which I bought from my local fabric shop.

It forms a loop of loveliness that can be worn as a scarf or a hat or both.

It is very warm and the cotton stops any itchy wool business, but I don’t like it.

Even when it got cold in Mongolia I rarely put it on.

So that’s the hubby, modelling mohair, in the tropics. Yes, I am still lugging the bloody thing around with me!

I sewed it using organic cotton on a wooden reel. I cut out them out with my all metal scissors. There is a metal hook and eye at the front, the elastic in the back is probably plastic! Want to make some? You can find fabrics, sewing supplies and purchase details here. 

It counts as of my Fair Share Fabric Project.

In 2015 I pledged to  use no more than my fair global share of fibres and they have to be sustainably sourced. Whats a global share? 11.74 kg per person of which 3.8 kg is natural fibres.  You can see how I am doing here

I don’t like synthetic fibres for a number of very good reason so I will be using mainly  natural fibres.

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Trousers homemade

Yes, I am a member of the all-female, Indoenesian-based, Madness tribute band. What? You haven’t heard of us? I made these super loose trousers with fabric from Leons in Manchester. It is a linen cotton mix Nice but rather too heavy for the tropics.

The design I made up myself. They are pleated at the front and elasticated at the back.

They hang in voluminous folds.

I sewed it using organic cotton on a wooden reel. I cut out them out with my all metal scissors. There is a metal hook and eye at the front, the elastic in the back is probably plastic! Want to make some? You can find fabrics, sewing supplies and purchase details here. 

These trousers count as of my Fair Share Fabric Project.

In 2015 I pledged to  use no more than my fair global share of fibres and they have to be sustainably sourced. Whats a global share? 11.74 kg per person of which 3.8 kg is natural fibres.  You can check my figures here.

I don’t like synthetic fibres for a number of very good reason so I will be using mainly  natural fibres.

 

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The MuMu of Modesty

This big and rather tent like top is extremely easy to wear. Long trousers, short trousers, no trousers even! With no zips or fastenings it is easy on, easy off making it ideal even for the beach.

Can I hear cries of “Are you mad” and “A beach dress should be summery? Colorful Pretty! What you have there looks serious, formal even! With 3/4 length sleeves….”

Well observed fashionistas but we may go home via Iran. Iran as you know has a dress code for women. The Mu Mu of modesty when worn with trousers and a headscarf will pass muster.

From beach to theocracy – I don’t think you can get much more multitasking than that! But obviously there are going to have to be compromises.

Details

The fabric is grey cotton with a raised stripe of contrasting colour and texture. Stiff rather than floaty this fabric conceals rather than drapes. It is densly woven so there is no peek aboo element (thanks be) making it modest and concealing. Although the tighter weave means it is warmer than a fine cotton say, it is still cool enough and its tent like qualities means it doesnt cling. The air can waft. In short good for both Iranian law and sunny weather.

Fabric

I bought the organic and fair-trade fabric on line from the Organic Textile Company. It cost around 27.00 including delivery. They have a good range of materials and designs. In their own words “All our fabrics are good quality inexpensive organic, cotton fairly traded.” Though they don’t actually have a fair-trade certificate you can see that they are committed to the cause. There are some nice personal details about the people they work with. I actually know who made my fabric.

NB the packaging was NOT PLASTIC FREE

Sadly the packaging was plastic. The fabric was sent in a plastic bag. I did ask about that and I was told “Due to the nature of what we send through the post it is not suitable for us to use paper packaging. We do reuse packaging that is from parcels that have been sent to us and we would be able to send out fabric using recycled packaging if it was requested by a customer.”

Read my full review of this company here

Details

Apart from the packaging this top contains no plastic

 Plastic Free Fabric – You can buy completely plastic free fabric from Offset Warehouse

Other Fabric – You can find a range of fair trade organic fabrics here

More info

While being of plastic free interest, this is also part of my fair share fabric project.  You can read all bout it and see my other clothes – home made and otherwise, here. 

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2015 Fair Share Fabric

Over the last few years I have been tracking clothing consumption. At the end of 2014 I did a wardrobe inventory. I had 45 items of clothing counting all my pairs of sock separately but all knickers as one item. Every else was counted individually.

Why the counting?In 2015 I pledged to  use no more than my fair global share of fibres and they have to be sustainably sourced. I wanted to see what I already had and what I would consequently need to purchase, make or craft out of foraged balckberries.
Whats a global share? 11.74 kg per person of which 3.8 kg is natural fibres.  You can check my figures here.
Whats Sustainable Clothing? You can read my clothing manifesto here
Activities I realise that clothes are dependant on lifestyle so I have included a history for each year outlining what we did.

2015
I bought 3.15 kg of natural fibre products and 3.2 kg of synthetic fibres. (Not all clothing).

Did

Got home in May. Parked the van ( after living in it for a year) and planned our next trip. To see Mongolia. We left the U.K. in May and travelled from Kazakhstan to Indonesia. Mostly overland only flying when there was no alternative to places where the ferries no longer run – sigh.
My clothes had to see me through monsoon, snow and blazing tropical heat. I attended a couple of reasonably smart parties. As I worked online I didn’t need a office clothes.
I made most of my backpacking wardrobe before I left. N.B. being on the road doesnt mean I can’t sew. I made my headscarf and backpackers bloomers while traveling.

History

Wore Out
Cotton Cargo Pants bought Summer 2014 Mountain Warehouse- dreadful purchase fell apart in less than a year.
Corduroy Trouser bought autumn 2014 Marks & Spencers worn almost continually in the autumn and winter of 2015. Died in the Spring of 2015 in China. Not exactly long lasting but one shouldn’t expect too much from corduroy and they did get worn a lot!

Lost
1 blue patterned Teeshirt. Bought 2013 Singapore lost by the laundry in 2015 Thailand

Gifted & Bought

  • Cashmere cardigan gifted (got lucky!)
  • Blue teeshirt cotton gifted

Made

I had to buy a new raincoat to replace the stupid, non-weatherproof rubbish I got from T.K.Max.

Terms Explained

By gifted I mean something that people have passed on to me because they no longer want it. Second hand but not purchased.
When I say cotton/ natural fibres to describe shop bought, that doesn’t include buttons and other such stuff which will almost certainly be synthetic. As might be the thread used to sew the fabric. Clothes may even contain 5% synthetic fibres to maintain shape.
Sorry if that seems evasive but this is a broad brush introduction. Over the next few months I hope to refine the information but you will have probably lost interest by then!
Unless you are talking about my own homemade clothes where I can tell you exactly what plastic has been used.

2014

Did

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Tunic Top – Fair-trade, organic-cotton, plastic-free & homemade

 

How can you afford fair trade and organic clothes on a budget? Make your own!

I wanted a long tunic style top with 3/4 length sleeves in thin cotton I could have bought a Billie Stripe Tunic in Navy Stripe from the People Tree made form 100% Organic Cotton costing £48.00. But last time I asked they posted their stuff out in plastic packaging. And it’s a bit expensive for me. Plus too short sleeves, too long length, knitted cotton takes ages to dry…. nah.

So I made one out of crinkly organic cotton that is “traded fairly”. It is similar to cheese cloth from the 70’s and is a nice sludgy airforce blue with an off- white stripe.  Doesn’t crumple, dries quickly and is great for backpacking.Total cost including delivery £27.00.

Fabric

I bought the organic and fair-trade fabric on line from the Organic Textile Company. They have a good range of materials and designs. In their own words “All our fabrics are good quality inexpensive organic, cotton fairly traded.” Though they don’t actually have a fair-trade certificate you can see that they are committed to the cause. There are some nice personal details about the people they work with. I actually know who made my fabric.

NB the packaging was NOT PLASTIC FREE

Sadly the packaging was plastic. The fabric was sent in a plastic bag. I did ask about that and I was told “Due to the nature of what we send through the post it is not suitable for us to use paper packaging. We do reuse packaging that is from parcels that have been sent to us and we would be able to send out fabric using recycled packaging if it was requested by a customer.”

Read my full review of this company here

Details

Apart from the packaging this top contains no plastic

 Plastic Free Fabric – You can buy completely plastic free fabric from Offset Warehouse

Other Fabric – You can find a range of fair trade organic fabrics here

More info

While being of plastic free interest, this is also part of my fair share fabric project.  You can read all bout it and see my other clothes – home made and otherwise, here. 

 

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Loon Pants

I was so pleased with my Scrappy Bo-ho Tunic I decided to make some lounge pants. Actually I wanted to practise for my next big project, trousers! But baby steps…first pyjama bottoms.
I had run out of scraps so I needed some new fabric. I bought some pretty Rose & Hubble print 100% percent cotton. They are so gorgeous I sometimes wear them out. At least I do so in China where it is quite acceptable to walk round in pyjamas. Really I mean it. Proper jim jams!

Sustainability Rating

  • Supporting local shops
  • Sewn with plastic-free cotton

Got the fabric from  Leons in Chorlton, Manchester. This store has been around for ages. They sell everything from gingham to fluero lycra. It is independent, a great resource and of course a local employer. It is much valued by the community and I was most pleased for some of my sustainable clothing budget to go towards supporting this fantastic local business

OPENING HOURS:

Mon-Sat 9:30am – 5:30pm
Late night Thursdays 8:00pm

Website www.leonsfabrics.co.uk

 

 

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Boho Tunic

BoHo Tunic

For summer I want something light, cool and colourful  so I made this tunic  using fabric scraps left over from other projects and a silk skirt I was unsure of. This is the result. Three different fabrics used on the bodice with the silk skirt attached.

Thank heavens BoHo is still in. Hey! I said BoHo not hobo!

Can be worn on its own or with teeshirts (both long sleeved and short).

Cost nothing! Yay!

Weight

As part of my Fair Share Fabric  Project I am monitoring how many fabrics I use in a year. Even though the skirt was recycled from a dress I have had for ages I am putting in a total weight.