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Eco Fluffy Mama Blog – with a strong focus on reusable menstrual products

Hi there, my name is Tamsin and I am the creator of the blog, Eco Fluffy Mama. My blog is based on Green Living, with a strong focus on reusable menstrual products and zero waste. I also write about my life as someone with multiple chronic illnesses. I am 29 years old and live in rural Suffolk with my son and fiance.

I am extremely passionate about reusable menstrual products, and helping others understand why disposables are bad for the planet and our health.

Projects-

I really enjoy helping others, and am currently working on distributing reusable menstrual products to charities that work with homeless people, and those living below the breadline. In 2015, I created a campaign called Ditch The Disposables – I worked with the UK’s leading retailers for Reusable Menstrual Products, and between us we generated 122 brand new menstrual cups to donate between the 2 charities that the campaign has sponsored.

For 2017, I am hoping to run another campaign to help more charities give reusable menstrual products to the people they help. This will eliminate waste, and help those in need to always have something to manage their period.

Links To Social Media:
Facebook – www.facebook.com/ecofluffymama
Twitter – https://twitter.com/EcoFluffyMama
Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/ecofluffymama/
YouTube – https://www.youtube.com/c/Ecofluffymama
Pinterest – https://uk.pinterest.com/ecofluffymama/

Please note..

This post was written by the contributor and  is  a PfU.K. Directory submission.

And the Pf U.K. Directory is…?
…a directory of UK-based groups, organisations businesses and individuals who are responding to the problems presented by the misuse of plastic. That does not mean anti-plastic necessarily but certainly plastic-problem aware.
The DIRECTORY is to promote their fantastic work. Read more here…

Got a project?
It is very easy to get a project featured. Each contributor submits a short synopsis of their project, focussing on the plastic aware element and I post it. You can read the submission guidelines here.

More

Find  more plastic free menstruation & tea here…

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Trial a plastic awareness game?

Any teachers out there want to trial a plastic awareness game?

The Auroville community in India are tackling plastic waste through education. Sometime ago I spoke to them about a children’s game they were developing – here is an update….

“Last year, interviewing experts was part of our research phase for developing a memory style card game which we have decided to call ‘kNOw PLASTICS’. The game educates children about the impact of plastics on animals, the environment and us.

We are now in the pilot testing phase of the game. Up till now we have tested the game in schools here in and around Auroville, Tamil Nadu, South India. It is a really rewarding experience and so much fun to see the children playing with the cards. So far we have received positive responses but we would like to get feedback from as many other children throughout schools the world over. We are looking to test the game internationally with students from diverse cultural background so that the game is relevant to as wide an audience as possible.

If you know of any schools, organisations or teachers then we would be very happy if you could connect us or test the kNOw PLASTICS game, please find below what this would entail:

  1. Printing the game in colour (we’ll send you the designs and clear instructions).
  2. Find 4 resource persons or teachers to help you or test the game (3-5 student per group).
  3. Playing the game with children and answer questions (takes about an hour and it lots of fun).
  4. Sending us the feedback and if you can Skype/WhatsApp call at your convenience.

Our goal is to complete pilot testing the game by the end of November, so our design team can finalise the game, print and launch it in February 2017.

When we have produced the game we would like to provide a free copy for a school or organisation you work with as a thank you for your assistance in pilot testing the game.

Please do help us test this game!

I really appreciate your time and effort and promise it won’t be a waste of time!

If you can help you can contact Chandra on wasteless@auroville.org.in
www.wastelessindia.org
 Facebook.com/WasteLess

 

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Helen McGonigal

Helen McGonigal is a happily married, mum of three from County Durham. She’s a writer, author of ‘Mummy Makes Milk’ and literacy workshop consultant. Helen blogs at Spot of Earth, where she writes about her passions which include education, parenting, the environment, cooking and children’s literature, among other things. The family’s zero waste journey kind of crept up on them!

As a family, we try to live as waste and plastic free as possible. This involves buying locally where possible from independent butchers, where we can use our own containers, and greengrocers, where most of the produce is loose. We also minimise plastic in the bathroom. We try to reuse any plastic that comes into the house as much as possible before it is disposed of.

I spread the word through my blog. I have also just added a plastic free assembly to my literacy workshop service, because I feel passionately that children can carry this message forward and make bigger changes.

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Thunderclap

I am always looking for ways to promote plastic reduction so I thought I would try this new approach from Thunderclap

“Thunderclap is the first-ever crowd speaking platform that helps people be heard by saying something together. It allows a single message to be mass-shared, flash mob-style, so it rises above the noise of your social networks. By boosting the signal at the same time. Thunderclap helps a single person create action and change like never before.
This is my message and I want to get it out there to as many people as possible “Cut plastic trash and limit your contact with endocrine disruptors with these 350+ plastic-free alternatives” with a link to my blog.

To do this I have to get support for my campaign from you the people.

How?

You visit this page and pledge your suport via one the social media channels you belong to – or indeed all of them!Once done you are added to my supporters total.

If I get 100 supporters Thunderclap will post my message on all the accounts following me on July 31st. creating one big social media shout out helping people cut plastic pollution for the good of the planet and thier health.

This is a one time message. You will not be spammed or anything nasty and if you change your mind you can opt out at any time.
Many thanks for your support. Together we can make changes! x

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What’s In The Bin?

This month we are once again taking part in Plastic Free July (pretty much as it sounds).

We will be keeping track of all the plastic trash we create.

So….Whats in the bin?

Week 1

So far everything in the bin is booze related. There are 2 metal. but plastic- lined caps off beer bottles and 3 foil / plastic lined seals off wine.

 

 

 

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2016 Plastic Free July Huddersfield as it happens…

Plastic Free July is an international event promoting a plastic-less lifestyle. Of course every month  is plastic free for me, but this month I get online more. I try to post a plastic-free tip a day. Find me on Twitter (#pfjuk), Facebook and recently, Instagram.

And to mark the occasion I have learnt how to Youtube…. These are my first ever Youtube videos….. I hope!?!

What is Plastic Free July

See more about Plastic Free July here

See It In Pictures

[instagram-feed]

Failures

Yoghurt!

I tried to make some yoghurt – it didn’t work. All I got was a teaspoon of yoghurt and whole load of runny juice. So I tried making pancake batter with flour eggs and yoghurt juice. That didn’t work either. Several flabby pancakes later I gave it up.

In the past I have tried eggs, flour and milk to wash my hair. What is pancake batter if not all three? Today I washed my hair with failed-yoghurt,failed- pancake batter. Because I’m worth it!

Day 1

Preparing for #PlasticFreeJuly UK #PfreeUK by getting  loose fruit & veg at the Peapod Grocery, Marsh. Also does unwrapped bread and fish and jam in returnable jars. Yay!  Read more here….

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Jerry Bottles

Jerry sell sustainable steel water bottles to raise funds for water projects around the world.  They love water so much that they give away 100% of their profits to bring water to those that don’t have it.

We sell steel water bottles to raise funds for water projects.  We are committed to promoting the #zerowaste movement and encouraging a cultural shift towards re-useables and sustainability.
Links – twitter – Facebook etc

https://twitter.com/jerrybottles

https://www.facebook.com/jerrybottles/

https://www.instagram.com/jerrybottle/

Please note…

This post was written by the contributor and  is  a PfU.K. Directory submission.

And the Pf U.K. Directory is…?

…a directory of UK-based groups, organisations businesses and individuals who are responding to the problems presented by the misuse of plastic. That does not mean anti-plastic necessarily but certainly plastic-problem aware.

The DIRECTORY is to promote their fantastic work. Read more here…

Got a project?
It is very easy to get a project featured. Each contributor submits a short synopsis of their project, focussing on the plastic aware element and I post it. You can read the submission guidelines here.

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The Plastic Challenge

 

Do what?

The Plastic Challenge takes place every year in the U.K. in June.

It is organised by the Marine Conservation Society (MCSUK).

The MSCUK is a UK charity “that cares for our seas, shores and wildlife”.

The Challenge

The MSCUK are deeply concerned about the amount of plastic polluting the sea and trashing the beaches. And understandably so. Since the ocean is downstream, much of the plastic trash generated on land ends up there. ” It has been estimated that 6.4 million tons of debris end up in the world’s oceans every year and that some 60 to 80 percent of that debris, or 3.8 to 5 million tons, is improperly discarded plastic litter “. Encyclopedia Brittanica.

You can read more here and see See lots of pictures documenting plastic beach pollution here…

But back to the challenge. The MSCUK “have a vision of a world where plastics don’t end up in our seas and on our beaches, where they persist and impact our marine life.”

So they challenge you to give up single use plastics for a month (June), and get sponsored whilst doing it. The money goes to support MSCUK projects which are many and very worthwhile.

Join In

Should you decide to join in, The Plastic Challenge web page has loads of information including;

  • ideas on fund raising and sponsorship forms;
  • a forum for posting questions and plastic free tips;
  • even a shop selling everything from highlighter pencils to menstrual cups;

Visit now to sign up and join in over at  @mcsuk and #plasticchallenge

Too Late?

Too late for sponsorship? Don’t let that stop you. No matter when you read this, cutting your plastic consumption will benefit you and the environment – whenever you do it. So even if it’s the last day in June… or the first of February… join in anyway.

Other Great Schemes

The MSCUK organise other projects to help combat plastic pollution including The Great British Beach Clean on the 16th – 19th September 2016.

Plenty of advance warning. Check out the details here.

Resources

Plastic Is Rubbish Facebook Group where plastivists discuss issues and share information about unwrapped compostable and reusable products. The fun never stops….

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WiseOceans

We are a marine education company passionate about reducing plastic pollution

Our team Lent plastic challenge profoundly affected us all and we are now dedicated to helping others reduce or remove plastic from their lives which in turn helps protect our wonderful oceans and the creatures that live within them. We have regular blogs about reducing plastic as well as informative articles about marine life. 

WiseOceans is a leading resource in marine conservation jobs, advice, news, events, marine education, information and recruiting marine educators. We are a specialist marine education and conservation company, striving to spread awareness for our wonderful yet fragile oceans and the fantastic creatures that live within them. The oceans are facing many threats and plastic pollution is one of top issues. We passionately believe that education is the key to helping the oceans and the marine life it supports: “In the end we will conserve only what we love, we will love only what we understand and we will understand only what we are taught” Baba Dioum

If engaging in a plastic free/waste free life has encouraged you to do more for the environment then our jobs page has lots of information about jobs, internships and volunteer positions in marine conservation (for novices as well as marine biologists).

Main Website: www.wiseoceans.com

Plastic blogs: www.wiseoceans.com/?s=plastic

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WiseOceans-190387421023845/ 

Twitter: Twitter.com/wiseoceans

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/wiseoceans/ 

Please note…

This post was written by the contributor. and  is  a PfU.K. Directory submission.

And the Pf U.K. Directory is…?

…a directory of UK-based groups, organisations businesses and individuals who are responding to the problems presented by the misuse of plastic. That does not mean anti-plastic necessarily but certainly plastic-problem aware.

The DIRECTORY is to promote their fantastic work. Read more here…

Got a project?

It is very easy to get a project featured. Each contributor submits a short synopsis of their project, focussing on the plastic aware element and I post it. You can read the submission guidelines here.

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Kedel Recycled Plastics

The Problems Presented By Plastic Misuse & How To Combat Them 

Today plastics dominate our lives. We use a shocking amount of plastic on a daily basis, often without even realising it. Some of the day to day plastic that we use includes plastic carrier bags, water bottles, the packaging that our food is wrapped in, beauty products, sanitary towels and cleaning products.

According to the United Nations Environmental Program, between 22 percent and 43 percent of the plastic used worldwide is disposed of in landfills. All this plastic is being wasted and more importantly, causing huge environmental problems.

It releases toxic chemicals into the atmosphere when burnt, kills ocean life and leaves unnecessary waste all over our planet. Experts are now describing some of the oceans around Australia as a ‘plastic soup’ filled with all sorts of plastic debris. Is this really how we want to treat our planet?

Plastics are here to stay. Literally. In the environment plastics will photodegrade which means they break up into smaller and smaller pieces, but they won’t disappear. To manage the build up of our waste we have a few different options: landfill, burn, or attempt to recycle.

Plastic is a killer. It kills millions of seabirds and ocean creatures every year who get caught up in plastic debris and discarded fishing nets, or end up trying to ingest plastic. In recognition of their impact countries such as Bangladesh or China banned the use of single plastic bags fourteen years ago.  The UK introduced a charge on single use plastic carrier bags in 2015.

What can you do to help?

Environmental and health issues are down to human behaviour. The good news is that this means that there is a recognisable solution, behaviour change. The bad news is that changing people’s behaviour worldwide isn’t an easy task. Plastic is one of the biggest environmental problems, yet it has a pretty straightforward solution: change behaviour.

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle kendal plastics features 2

Three simple words to live by.  If we can reduce our consumption that is great.  If you have to buy plastic then at least make an effort to reuse it. Many things can be safely reused over and over again. If you cannot reuse something then recycle it.  A lot of plastics can’t be recycled so do check with your local authority.

Plastic water bottles

Can you invest in a long lasting bottle and save yourself the hassle and money of buying single use plastic bottles? People spend a lot more than they realise on plastic bottles each year, you could save quite a bit of money by investing in a reusable water bottle.

If you are caught out and you need to buy a plastic bottle, try and remember to take the lid off and rinse it out when you recycle it.  Young children overseas painstakingly unscrew every bottle top from the plastic bottles so that the bottles can be recycled (different plastics) that high income countries ship for recycling.

Food shopping

Instead of using plastic bags, get into the habit of carrying a small foldaway bag in your handbag. Also when you are buying your weekly food shop, or any products, try and avoid buying things with lots of plastic packaging.

Make a song and dance

We need to start questioning companies not only why they are using so much plastic (it costs the earth but it also costs them and therefore us). Excessive packaging equals higher charges for us.

Can they look at innovative ways to protect our produce?  Does a beauty or hygiene product really need plastic in it? It’s frustrating that more supermarkets don’t provide biodegradable bags such as corn based for fruit and vegetables. Don’t be afraid to question companies and try and inspire change.

These are just some of the things you can do to help. There are so many ways you can alter your lifestyle in order to help the environment. You might not think you can personally make a huge difference, but every little helps.

David is an expert on recycling and is passionate about helping to save our planet. He regularly writes for environmental, eco-living and recycling websites and is a key writer for kedel.co.uk, a company that sells recycled plastics.

Here are Facebook and Twitter links

Please note…

This post was written by the contributor and  is  a PfU.K. Directory submission.

And the Pf U.K. Directory is…?

…a directory of UK-based groups, organisations businesses and individuals who are responding to the problems presented by the misuse of plastic. That does not mean anti-plastic necessarily but certainly plastic-problem aware.

The DIRECTORY is to promote their fantastic work. Read more here…

Got a project?
It is very easy to get a project featured. Each contributor submits a short synopsis of their project, focussing on the plastic aware element and I post it. You can read the submission guidelines here.

 

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Supermarket Feedback by Lyn Bull and the Zero Hero’s

Lyn Bull administrator for the Facebook group Zero Waste Hero’s recently posed the question

“Any suggestions for quick, easy, no cost or low-cost zero waste actions our supermarkets could take? Quick wins.”

A lively debate followed. She has collated the answers for your  edification.

Waste, litter, recycling and landfill issues are increasingly in the news. A growing number of people are seeking out independent shops in a bid to cut down their consumption of unwanted, unnecessary packaging and single use products. Our major supermarkets too can play their part in this move to take responsibility for the waste we all produce.

In March 2016 I asked our Zero Waste Week Heroes Facebook group for suggestions for ‘quick, easy, no cost or low cost zero waste actions our supermarkets could take’. Below are some of their suggestions – not an exhaustive list but more a starting point for a supermarket that is considering its place in the contemporary market place.

On entry and across the store

Display your commitment to reducing plastic and single use containers

Actually show/tell people how to reduce plastic waste through signs or labels

Stock plastic free packaged alternatives where possible

Availability of loose fresh fruit and veg 

  • Signs encouraging people to bring their own cotton bags for loose fruit and veg
  • Since lots of people seem to have supermarket branded shopping bags there could easily be a market for the supermarkets to sell reusable cotton veg and fruit bags
  • Spring onions in non-recyclable plastic film? They used to have a rubber band and a label only
  • As above for swede and cucumber!
  • Provide compostable paper bags instead of plastic or at least as an alternative. Mark bags ‘I am compostable’
  • Some weigh machines instruct you to put loose fruit and veg in a plastic bag – should be easy to change that to just ‘bag’ and provide paper bags as an alternative.
  • Provide loose fruit as an alternative to those in nets at the same price – I don’t need a net to help me count 3 lemons etc

At the Deli/Bakery/Meat/Fish counter

  • Encourage people to use deli counter, cheese counter, etc.
  • What about encouraging their delis, meat and fish counters to put the produce into customers own containers rather than bags? Ohhh…and not using a piece of plastic to weigh these items 
  • My local deli uses greaseproof paper bags for cheese which I can compost. I’d be very pleased if a supermarket deli counter could cut the cheese and not just hand over a bit already Clingfilm wrapped
  • Compostable waxed paper cartons could replace those wretched plastic clam shells

Tinned/canned/dry goods

  • Don’t wrap plastic around 4 tins of beans or toms etc. I can count and so can the person on the checkout
  • Sell items like pasta in paper bags instead of single use plastic

A bit more…

You an find lots more supermarket related posts here.

the P-f U.K. Directory

This post was written by the contributor. It has been posted in the  PfU.K. Directory.

And the P-f U.K. Directory is…?

…a directory of UK-based groups, organisations businesses and individuals who are responding to the problems presented by the misuse of plastic. That does not mean anti-plastic necessarily but certainly plastic-problem aware.

The DIRECTORY is to promote their fantastic work. Read more here…

Got a project?
It is very easy to get a project featured. Each contributor submits a short synopsis of their project, focussing on the plastic aware element and I post it. You can read the submission guidelines here.

 

Supermarkets – All stores product list

Have to shop in supermarkets? If so you might despair of living a plastic free life. After all supermarkets are super keen on packaging.

Hooray then for Louise Bayfield and her  “POSTIVE PRODUCTS LIST (UK) a list of High Street and Supermar-ket products that have no packaging or in some way help reduce packaging.”

Shopping Tips

If you want to buy loose, you will need to take your own reusable packaging – produce bags, tupperware even compostable disposables. You can find them here.
The plastic free freak should remember that
metal lids to glass jars are of course plastic lined .
Tin and cans including those for cosmetics are also plastic lined
Paper and foil wraps will be plastic lined.

Choose Well
If you really can’t do without it and you have a choice a plastic wrapped products, choose to buy the one in simple plastics that can easily be recycled

Many of these stores I have never been in. Others of course I often use. I have linked my reviews here
Lidles
Morrisons
Wilcos
Tescos 
Whole Food Market – if we have to have supermarkets let them be like this….

How To Do It
Eating for a week, plastic-free, only from supermarkets  – a case study.
Supermarkets feedback planning the supermarket of the future

Other places to buy unpackaged food are listed here.

The List

Do remember not all stores stock all products. It might be wise to check ahead if you are making a special visit. The original PDF will be updated as  Louise shops around so do check back there for updates. 

Once again thank you  Louise for such a fantastic resource!

Widely Available At Most Supermarkets

Bread Mixes – Paper
Ecover Laundry Powder – Cardboard, no scoop
Fruit and Vegetables – Bulk, take your own bags
Instore Butcher, Deli, Fish Counters and Bakery- Bulk, take bags and containers
Flour, Sugar, Eggs and Oats – Almost always available in paper or card
Frozen Produce in Cardboard – Linda McCartney, Fish (MSC), Potato Waffles Shake box to check there’s no plastic inside
Pasta and Rice in 3KG-10kg bags – Choose plastic (not film), reuse or recycle at Sainsbury’s. See some notes about which plastic is best, here.
Soap Bars – Paper or cardboard
Twinings Tea bags in biodegradable plastic (but the teabags contain plastic)

Aldi

Ale and Cider, excellent value selection of British brewed drinks in glass
Cake and bread mix – Paper
Oats – Paper
Rapeseed Oil, British, cold-pressed – Glass, foil and metal cap

ASDA

Cake Mix, Wright’s – Paper

Coconut Oil – Glass and metal

Cornflour, Brown and Polson – Cardboard, I believe this may be bagless inside

Coffee, instant, extra large sizes – Various packaging

Double Edge Razor Blades 10’s – Cardboard and small plastic cover

Ecover Washing Powder – Cardboard, no scoop

Fruit and Vegetables – Currently the largest selection of loose produce

Fish Fingers, Birds Eye 30 MSC – Big pack to save on packaging – Cardboard

Gram Flour – Paper

Laundry Stain Removal Soap Bar – Cardboard

Oats – Several Brands – Cardboard

Pasta, Fusilli 3kg – Plastic, recycle at Sainsbury’s

Pizza bar – Larger stores – Has anyone tried to buy one of these unwrapped yet?

Rice, Various 4 – 10kg bags, biggest selection – Various packaging

Spices, fresh garlic, ginger and chili – Bulk

Washing-up Eco Liquid, ASDA Own Brand 1litre – Plastic but larger than most, great value

World Foods – Always a few unexpected surprises in this department, please let me know what you find.

Boots

BecoThings Potty and Step stool, reusable – Biodegradable and cardboard packaging

Boltanics Toiletry Range – Organic, midrange – Some items in glass with plastic tops

Bath Salts – Cardboard

Burt’s Bees – Some products in Glass with metal lids and tins

Double Edge Razor Blades 10’s– Cardboard and small plastic cover

Essential Oils – Glass – Various tops

Lip Tins – Metal

Mooncup – Cardboard

Nivea Creme – Tin

Naty by Nature Nappies – Biodegradable

Origins Toiletry Range, plant based and free from lots of nasties – A few glass items – Pricey

Reusable nappies and supplies

Wooden Handled Brushes with FSC mark, Boltanics and Ecotool range for Make-up and hair – Packaging unknown

Co-op

Bread and Cake mixes – Paper – Really good selection in some larger stores

Costco / Cash and Carry

Save on waste buy buying big packs – Business Customers only

Homesence

Castile Soap, Larger bottles – Packaging varies but mostly plastic

Shampoo/conditioner/shower gel/ Bath – Very large bottles, sometimes organic and glass packaging

Soap Bars, sometimes organic- Beautifully wrapped in paper/card – Good gifts

Candles – Often votives in glass or metal tins with no packaging or cardboard box

Glassware – Recycled water glasses and sometimes goblets, No packaging other than a small sticker to base.

Many home items are unpackaged other than a price sticker. Some items are surplus. A good place to look for

Zero Waste Kitchenalia – Glass Jars, Stainless Steel Water Bottles, Insulated Travel Mugs, Tea strainers/Infusers,

Reusable Silicone Bakeware, Wooden Brushes, Scrubbers, Coffee presses, Wooden Boards, Wooden Bowls etc…

Some will be in cardboard or unpackaged with sticker.

Iceland

Has anyone ever ventured in?

Ikea

Crisp breads – Paper

Kilner style Jars – Good value – Paper and sticker

Loose sweets pick & mix stall with paper bags

Lidles See full review here

Butter – Paper

Bread, loaves and rolls – Bulk from Bakery – Very good selection

Breadcrumbs – Cardboard – Can anyone confirm there is no bag inside?

Bread Mixes, various larger bags – Paper

Cake Mixes, various – Paper – Seasonal item not always in stock

Cornflour – Cardboard – Can anyone confirm that there is no bag inside?

Doughnuts – Bulk from Bakery

Feta – Glass Jar

Fish Fingers and battered fish, MSC – Cardboard

Fruit and Vegetables – Reasonable selection of loose produce

Nuts, salted cashews, pistachios – Bulk bins – Take very light weight bags as no tare

Oats – Paper – Excellent value

Pastries, Croissants, Pain Au Choc and various Danishes – Bulk from Bakery

Pizza Slices – Bulk from Bakery

Rice, white – Cardboard

Salt – Cardboard

Washing powder, non-bio – Cardboard – No plastic scoop

Lush

Bath bombs and fizzers – Bulk

Hair dye blocks, Henna/Indigo – Several shades – Bulk

Toothie Tabs – Cardboard

Soap – Bulk

Shampoo and Conditioner bars – Bulk

Most other products are in recyclable pots – return to store for free product

M&S

Herbs and spices – Glass with metal lids

Knickers

Morrisons – see more here

Cake Mix, Wright’s – Paper

Fish Fingers, Birds Eye 30 MSC – Big pack to save on packaging – Cardboard

Oats – Quaker, Scots Porridge and Own brand – Cardboard

Spices, fresh ginger, chili and garlic – Bulk

Neal’s Yard

Various organic toiletries in returnable glass. Can be pricey.

L’Occitane

Organic beauty and toiletries, some in glass. Aspirational prices.

Ocado

Cake Mix, Wright’s – Paper

You cleaner refills – A concentrated eco cleaner in small plastic bottles

Poundland

Selection of glass kilner style jars – great for those on a budget

String

Robert Dyas

Borax Substitute, Dri-pac – Cardboard

Sainsbury’s

Butter, farmhouse, located near deli – Paper

Baking Powder, sachets – Paper and cardboard

Bicarbonate of Soda, sachets – Can anyone confirm packaging?

Berries, Frozen Basics – Plastic bag only – Return to store

Cake Mix, Wright’s – Paper

Cat Litter, Bio catolet – Litter and packaging have green credentials

Dishwasher Powder – Cardboard with small metal pourer – Works well in smaller quantities

Ecover Washing Powder – Large boxes – Cardboard

Fish Fingers, Birds Eye 30 MSC – Big pack to save on packaging – Cardboard

Lasagne Sheets, Basics – Windowless Cardboard

Naty Nature Care Nappies – Biodegradable

Oats, Quaker and Flahavan’s – Cardboard / Paper

Pizza Bar – Larger Stores – Has anyone brought one unwrapped yet?

Double Edge Razor Blades 10’s– Cardboard and small plastic cover

Soap Bars, various including organic – Cardboard

Spaghetti 3kg – Plastic – Can be brought back to store for recycling

Toilet Paper, 100% recycled, 6 space saving rolls – Plastic wrap can be recycled in store

Vinegar, Sarson’s distilled White 568ml – Glass bottle, plastic cap

Washing Powder, Own Brand – Cardboard – no plastic scoop

Plastic bag recycling bins in store entrance – Sainsbury’s products with this type of packaging are clearly marked.

Any brands can be deposited but check they are plastic and not film. As a rule film cleanly tears and is louder

when crunched, plastic is softer and stretches when pulled.

Staples

Toilet Tissue, Maxima – 100% recycled – Large cardboard box, no inner tubes

Toilet Rolls, 8 pack – 100% recycled – Plastic wrap, recycle at Sainsbury’s

Envelopes, various sizes, business size bulk packs – 100% recycled – Cardboard box

Tea and Coffee – Huge catering size packs, various packaging, shake box to check there’s no plastic inside

Tesco – See more Tescos products here

Bath Salts, Radox – Cardboard

Coffee Beans, Lavazza 1kg – Usual non-recyclable packaging, largest available

Double Edge Razor Blades 10’s– Cardboard and small plastic cover

Ecover Washing Powder – Cardboard, no scoop

Fish Fingers, Birds Eye 30 MSC – Big pack to save on packaging – Cardboard

Cat litter, Sanicat Eco – I believe this is in a paper bag

Olive Oil, Il Casolare – Flip top glass bottle, reusable?

Tea Bags Miles West Country Tea – Paper bag, can anyone confirm that this is not laminated?

 

Wilcos

Bicarbonate of Soda, large crystals – Cardboard

Borax Substitute – Cardboard

See more Wilcos Products here

Waitrose

Bakery, rolls, cakes, fancy cakes and childrens decorated biscuits – Bulk

Butter, British – Paper

Borax Substitute, Dri-pac – Cardboard – Larger stores only

Bread Mix, good selection – Paper

Cat Litter, Waitrose wood pellets – Recycled wood and paper packaging

Coconut Oil, Groovy Food, Organic – Glass Metal

Coffee – Free with my Waitrose card – Take own cup

Dishwasher Powder – Cardboard

Fish Fingers, Birds Eye 30 MSC – Big pack to save on packaging – Cardboard

Juice Bar – Could ask for a refill ? – Not available in all stores

Neal’s Yard Products – Glass can be returned to Neal’s Yard shops for refund

Naty Nature Care Nappies – Biodegradable

Oats – Flahavan’s, Mornflake, Quaker – Paper and cardboard

Soap Bars – Including organic – Paper and Cardboard

Toilet Rolls, 9 pack, 100% recycled – Plastic wrap (recycle at Sainsbury’s)

Vinegar, Sarson’s distilled White 568ml – Glass Bottle

YOU cleaner refills – A concentrated eco cleaner refill in plastic